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Brussels Royal Palace (Palais Royal de Bruxelles)
Brussels Royal Palace (Palais Royal de Bruxelles)

Brussels Royal Palace (Palais Royal de Bruxelles)

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Place du Palais, Brussels, 1000

The Basics

Explore the lavish State Rooms, designed by Alphonse Balat for King Leopold II, and marvel at the grand marble staircase, glittering chandeliers, and opulent furnishings. Highlights include the Goya Room, with its striking Goya-inspired tapestries; the Mirror Room, with its jeweled ceiling; the Empire Room ballroom; and the dazzling Throne Room.

Most Brussels sightseeing tours stop to admire the Brussels Royal Palace facade, while independent visitors can explore at their own pace on a hop-on hop-off tour or enjoy a walking tour of the surrounding Parc de Bruxelles. Guided tours of the palace are also possible during the annual summer opening.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The Brussels Royal Palace is a must-see for any first-time visitor or history buff in Belgium.

  • Visits to the palace during the summer opening are free, but only possible as part of an official guided tour.

  • The palace is fully accessible for wheelchair users.

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How to Get There

The palace is located on Place de Palais at the south side of the Parc de Bruxelles (Brussels Park), about 1 mile (1.3 kilometers) southeast of downtown Brussels. Trams 92, 93, and 94 all pass the palace, while the nearest metro stations are Trone and Parc. Hop-on hop-off buses also stop nearby, while walking tours typically pass the palace.

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Trip ideas

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When to Get There

It’s possible to admire the palace exteriors all year round, but the Royal Palace opens its doors to the public each summer, from the National Holiday on July 21 to September, when it’s open daily except Mondays.

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Other Beautiful Brussels Buildings

The Brussels Royal Palace is beautiful inside and out, but the Belgium capital has plenty more architectural delights up its sleeve. The steel-and-glass Musical Instrument Museum is an example of Brussels' art nouveau leanings, as is the Maison Saint Cyr. For something a bit more modern, the Atomium—a futuristic metal structure—is also worth a visit.

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