Recent Searches
Clear
Gwanghwamun Gate
Gwanghwamun Gate

Gwanghwamun Gate

Free admission
161 Sajik-ro, Jongno-gu

The Basics

As one of Seoul’s most prominent landmarks, Gwanghwamun Gate is featured on most sightseeing tours of the city, along with Gyeongbokgung Palace, the Blue House, Insadong, Bukchon Hanok Village, Myeongdong, and Jogyesa Temple. Korean and foreign visitors alike come to Gwanghwamun Square to see the gate with Inwangsan Mountain in the backdrop, as well as the imposing statue of King Sejong the Great, inventor of the Hangul alphabet, seated on his throne.

Show all

Things to Know Before You Go

  • Gwanghwamun is a must-see for history buffs, families, and first-time visitors.

  • Both the gate and the changing of the guard are free, but Gyeongbokgung Palace charges an entrance fee.

  • The gate and palace are wheelchair accessible, and wheelchairs are available for rent.

Show all

How to Get There

The gate’s central location in the heart of Seoul makes it easy to reach via public transportation. The most convenient way to get there is to take the metro to City Hall Station (Lines 1 and 2), Gyeongbokgung Station (Line 3), or Gwanghwamun Station (Line 5). Several public buses also stop nearby.

Show all

Trip ideas

How to Spend 3 Days in Seoul

How to Spend 3 Days in Seoul


When to Get There

Plan your visit to Gwanghwamun Gate to coincide with the changing of the guard, a ceremony that occurs hourly from midmorning until mid-afternoon. If you’re visiting during the summer, plan to visit early in the day to avoid the heat.

Show all

Gwanghwamun Gate and the Japanese Occupation

For many Koreans, Gwanghwamun Gate represents a tragic chapter in Korean history. In 1926, during the Japanese occupation of South Korea, the gate was destroyed to make way for a Japanese government building. The gate was rebuilt in a different location in 1968, then moved to its original spot as part of a $24 million renovation in 2006.

Show all